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There are over 120 types of brain tumour – glioblastoma (GBM4), meningioma, astrocytoma, and glioma are just a few of the names. In some cases brain surgery is necessary; in others it may just be question of watch and wait. But you need to know what the best course of action is.

Discover the brain tumour support and advice we can give  

Brain tumour FAQ

This is your space where you can have your say. You know those questions which pop into your head at 3am? Ask them here; find an answer here. We have got the ball rolling for you with questions which we know patients ask. But we need your questions and your answers. Fire away.

  • What support can I expect?

    That depends. You will probably end up orchestrating much of the support yourself. brainstrust can help you do this. Sometimes it is the carer who needs the support. That’s fine too. We are here for all of you. Don’t forget to look at www.braintumourhub.org.uk which will point you in the direction of where you might find support. And your clinical nurse specialist should be able to signpost you too. So with brainstrust behind you and your clinicians you should have a great team. Respond to this question

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  • Will I ever be able to drive again?

    You are legally required to let the DVLA know if you have had seizures, brain surgery or a brain tumour diagnosis. It will, with your permission, contact your consultant who will complete one of the DVLA’s proformas. It will decide how long you must not drive for. This is a huge issue, because it isn't just about driving, it is about independence. You may need to develop other ways of getting around. And if you are claiming the disability living allowance, you could use some of this for taxis. A really comprehensive overview has been produced by Cambridge University Hospitals: http://www.cuh.org.uk/resources/pdf/patient_information_leaflets/PIN1558_DVLA_info.pdf
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  • How long will I live? Why can’t you tell me?

    Try to accept accept that the doctors don't know the answers and try not to think too far ahead but live life as best you can in the here and now. It also helps if people acknowledge the devastation that this disease causes. Try to remember you are living with a brain tumour, not dying of it. And for some people this could be for years. Respond to this question
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Date published: 17-05-2009   Last edited: 30-05-2012   Due for review 31-05-2014 brainstrust - information standard accredited brain tumour information

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