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Becoming a carer for someone can happen abruptly or creep in slowly unnoticed until one day you realise you are caring more for someone else than you are for yourself.

It is not a job you applied for. We know. And this new job as a carer can become as frightening as the initial diagnosis. Here we can help you...

Caregivers

About one in every ten adults is a carer in the UK. This is not a role that many have chosen for themselves. And when caring for someone with brain cancer the demands that you will face can be unexpected, difficult and lonely but the role can also be rewarding. This area has been developed specifically for carers of people with brain cancer; much of the information has been contributed by people who found themselves in this position.

Pointers

There is nothing like hearing practical advice from carers who have been there, done that. This page would really benefit from being created by you; the people who know, and have developed tried and tested ways of caring and overcoming difficulties with practical solutions.

Pointers

End Of Life Care

At some point in the course of a malignant brain tumour, it is likely that treatment options will run out. Supportive care should become the focus. But this makes it easier than it is. Decisions are complex enough without the added difficulty of highly charged emotions that may differ between family members, so it does help to have some guiding principles.

End Of Life Care

Children / Young Adults

It is a tragic fact the brain cancer kills more children than any other illness in the UK. It is also the most common form of cancer in teenagers and young adults. This will change. Leukaemia was once thought to be terminal; it is treatable and curable today. One day it will be the same for brain cancer.

Supporting the younger generation

Support Groups

Not for everyone and sometimes only for a short period. But support groups can be really good at letting you know you are not alone. You can share information and hope, find mutual support and discover new ways to cope. Some are more adaptive than others. However, they can also cause feelings of depression and guilt, particularly if one person is doing poorly.

Support Groups

Date published: 17-05-2009   Last edited: 17-05-2009   Due for review 31-01-2014

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